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Real Time machine learning Classification in Ion Mobility Spectrometry

February 2021

In this short video we demonstrate the coffee classification. In the first step the volatiles in the coffee are separated based on retention time and reduced ion mobility. In second step the classification based on Random Forest Classifier is done. The output shows 100% agreement with prepared coffee mixture.

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CASE STUDY: Low ppb detection of Hydrogen Chloride (HCl) and Hydrogen Fluoride (HF) by Advanced Ion Mobility Spectrometer – AIMS

January 2021

In this short Laboratory Report we demonstrate the ability of Ion Mobility Spectrometer operated in sub-atmospheric pressure for continuous monitoring of HCl and HF at low ppb level.

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TETRAMETHYL ORTHOSILICATE (TMOS) DETECTION BY ADVANCED ION MOBILITY SPECTROMETER - AIMS

August 2020

In this new Laboratory Report we demonstrate the ability of Ion Mobility Spectrometer operated in sub-atmospheric pressure for continuous monitoring of Tetramethyl Orthosilicate (TMOS) at low ppb level. The main advantage of Ion Mobility Spectrometry is related with fast response. For more about IMS response on TMOS please see our video or download pdf:

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HEXAMETHYLDISILAZANE (HMDS) DETECTIONS BY ADVANCED ION MOBILITY SPECTROMETER - AIMS

May 2020

In this short Laboratory Report we demonstrate the ability of Ion Mobility Spectrometry operated in sub-atmospheric pressure for continuous monitoring of Hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS) at low ppb level. The main advantage of Ion Mobility Spectrometery is related with fast response. For more about IMS response on HMDS please see our video.

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ACIDS DETECTION AND QUANTIFICATION IN PREFRIED FRENCH FRIES BY PAIMS

April 2020

We demonstrate fast and easy detection & quantification of acids in prefried potatoes. The Acids monitoring is required for quality control in french fries production. In this short application video we demonstrate ability of Ion Mobility Spectrometry for this task.

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MaSaTECH get Horizon 2020 funding, in project RISEN

March 2020
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We are proud that our company was successfully awarded by Horizon 2020, grant funded by EU for most innovative companies. The Ion Mobility Spectrometer from MaSaTECH will be used in the RISEN Consortium for security applications.

Portable Advanced Ion Mobility Spectrometer integrated to UGV

February 2020
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LAB STORY: In 2014 we published the article dealing with new technique based on LASER desorption Ion Mobility Spectrometry for fast analysis of solids and surfaces ( DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00621F ). The applications was primary proposed for security due to its very low detection limit of explosives. During the time I quit the job at University and started MaSaTECH together with Prof. Matejcik. After that we been contacted by guys from Warsaw Military University of Technology for work on development of Unmanned Ground Vehicle (UGV) for remote detection of explosives based on LASER desorption - IMS. After two years of hard work become this UGV true. It is nice feeling when the laboratory work comes to real life. BIG THANKS belong to group of Dr. Bartlomiej Jankiewicz from Warsaw Military University of Technology.

New product Multi Column Capillary Gas Chromatography – Ion Mobility Spectrometry

December 2019
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PeakMachine -Multi Column Capillary Gas Chromatography – Ion Mobility Spectrometry MCCGC-IMS is new product of MaSaTECH. The best working parameters in the field making this instrument excellent for analysis of VOCs in complex matrix like food and beverages. The head space, SPME or direct liquid sampling technique can be used for analysis of samples. The details of the instrument will be present on our web soon. Some of the working parameters of PeakMachine are:

- IMS drift cell working temperature 50-160 degree.

- IMS drift cell working pressure 600-1010 mbar.

- Resolving power 100 FWHM

- Possibility to use of dopant (reactant ion peak modifier)

- Plasma ionization source – No radioactive

- Direct data measurement in reduced mobility mode.

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Fast quantification of whisky lactone in oak wood by ion mobility spectrometer

November 2019

Thanks to group of Professor Stefan Matejcik for his collaboration on this nice article. This paper demonstrating the possibilities of ion mobility spectrometry for elegant detection and quantification of whisky lactone in oak wood.

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Talanta, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.talanta.2019.120567

An Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) apparatus has been used to detect the β-methyl-γ-octalactone (Whisky Lactone – WL) standard in the air and as well WL vapours originating from the oak wood samples. The IMS was equipped with Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionisation (APCI) ion source based on a Corona Discharge (CD) and was operated in the positive polarity. The IMS spectrum of WL exhibits two peaks, a monomer with reduced ion mobility value K0 = 1.39 cm2V−1s−1 and dimer K0 = 1.09 cm2V−1s−1. Using Ion Mobility orthogonal acceleration Time of Flight mass spectrometer (IMS-oaTOF MS) these peaks were identified as protonated monomer M·H+·(H2O)0,1 and dimer M2·H+ ions respectively. The limit of detection study resulted in LOD for WL of 50 ppbv. Detection of WL from oak wood samples of different “Quality Level” (QL) categories (categories 1 to 10), indicated strong correlation between the QL category number and the response of the IMS.

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Online coupling of microchip electrophoresis with ion mobility spectrometry for direct analysis of complex liquid samples

October 2019

Thanks to Professor Marian Masar for his nice work in collaboration with MaSaTECH. This work demonstrating the possibilities AIMS instruments operated in subatmospheric pressure.

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Sensors and Actuators B: Chemical 302 (2020) 127183

This is the first report of coupling of microchip electrophoresis (MCE) with ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) for the analysis of liquid samples. Zone electrophoresis, employed on a microchip as a MCE technique, is suitable for coupling with IMS. Sample components separated electrophoretically in liquid phase were transferred from the microchip using auxiliary liquid. Direct liquid sampling interface was used for sample evaporation and introduction to IMS. In the IMS analyzer, the sample components were further separated in the gaseous phase. Online MCE-IMS coupling enabled acquisition of characteristic IMS response for the individual analytes. The proposed MCE-IMS technique was tested on a model mixture of a homologous series of carboxylic acids (formic acid, acetic acid, propionic acid, butyric acid, valeric acid and hexanoic acid) and subsequently applied to the analysis of wastewater sample obtained from a cattle farm. Total analysis time did not exceed six minutes regardless of the sample. Reproducibility of peak width in the MCE ranged from 0.56 to 1.95% RSD, while reproducibility of time of IMS response was in the range of 2.52–5.44% RSD for the studied carboxylic acids. RSD values of their reduced ion mobility were less than 0.56% for model and wastewater sample. Limits of detection ranged from 0.07 to 2.61 mg L−1. The results clearly show the great analytical potential of developed MCE-IMS coupling for the analysis of complex liquid samples.

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Portable-Advanced Ion Mobility Spectrometer as a detector for Agilent GC

June 2019
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MaSaTECH was invited for collaboration with Ingeniería Analítica, S.L. for interface of Portable Advanced Ion Mobility Spectrometer to Gas Chromatograph from Agilent. The GC-IMS combination is excellent combination for 2D analysis of complex matrix in food, beverage, pharmaceutical and environmental industry.

Isomer and Conformer Selective Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionisation of dimethyl phthalate

June 2019
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Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics, 2019, DOI: 10.1039/C9CP02069A

In this work we have studied ionisation mechanism of Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionisation (ACPI) for three isomers of dimethyl phthalate (dimethyl phthalate – DMP (ortho - isomer), dimethyl isophthalate – DMIP (meta) and dimethyl terephthalate – DMTP (para)) using Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) and IMS combined with orthogonal acceleration Time of Flight Mass Spectrometer (oa-TOF MS). The molecules were chemically ionised by reactant ions H+·(H2O)n (n=3 and 4). The positive IMS and IMS-oaTOF mass spectra of isomers showed significant differences in the ion mobilities and in the ion composition. The IMS – oaTOF spectra consisted of clusters ions M·H+·(H2O)n with different degree of hydration (n=0,1,2,3) for different isomers. In the case of DMP isomer we have observed almost exclusive formation of M·H+ by proton transfer ionisation, while in case of DMIP and DMTP hydrated ions M·H+·(H2O)n (n=1,2,3) respectively M·H+·(H2O)n (n=0,1,2) were detected, formed via adduct formation reaction. This behavior was elucidated by differences in ionisation processes. In order to elucidate the ionisation processes we have carried out DFT calculations of the structures and energies of the neutral and protonated and hydrated isomers (for different conformers) and calculated corresponding proton affinities (PA) and hydration energies.

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Effect of Basicity and Structure on the Hydration of Protonated Molecules, Proton-Bound Dimer and Cluster Formation: An Ion Mobility-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry and Theoretical Study

May 2019
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Journal of The American Society for Mass Spectrometry, 2019, DOI: 10.1007/s13361-019-02180-z

Protonation, hydration, and cluster formation of ammonia, formaldehyde, formic acid, acetone, butanone, 2-ocatanone, 2-nonanone, acetophenone, ethanol, pyridine, and its derivatives were studied by IMS-TOFMS technique equipped with a corona discharge ion source. It was found that tendency of the protonated molecules, MH+, to participate in hydration or cluster formation depends on the basicity of M. The molecules with higher basicity were hydrated less than those with lower basicity. The mass spectra of the low basic molecules such as formaldehyde exhibited larger clusters of MnH+(H2O)n, while for compounds with high basicity such as pyridine, only MH+ and MH+M peaks were observed. The results of DFT calculations show that enthalpies of hydrations and cluster formation decrease as basicities of the molecules increases. Using comparison of mass spectra of formic acid, formaldehyde, and ethanol, effect of structure on the cluster formation was also investigated. Formation of symmetric (MH+M) and asymmetric proton-bound dimers (MH+N) was studied by ion mobility and mass spectrometry techniques. Both theoretical and experimental results show that asymmetric dimers are formed more easily between molecules (M and N) with comparable basicity. As the basicity difference between M and N increases, the enthalpy of MH+N formation decreases.

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Study of Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mechanism in Corona Discharge Ion Source with and without NH3 Dopant by Ion Mobility Spectrometry combined with Mass Spectrometry: A Theoretical and Experimental Study

2019-01-17
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J. Phys. Chem. A, 2019, 123 (1), pp 313–322 DOI: 10.1021/acs.jpca.8b11417

Ionization of 2-nonanone, cyclopentanone, acetophenone, pyridine, and di-tert-butylpyridine (DTBP) in a corona discharge (CD) atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) ion source was studied using ion mobility (IMS) and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF–MS). The IMS and MS spectra were recorded in the absence and presence of ammonia dopant. Without NH3dopant, the reactant ion (RI) was H+(H2O)n, n = 3,4, and the MH+(H2O)x clusters were produced as product ions. Modeling of hydration shows that the amount of hydration (x) depends on basicity of M, temperature and water concentration of drift tube. In the presence of ammonia (NH4+(H2O)nas RI) two kinds of product ions, MH+(H2O)x and MNH4+(H2O)x, were produced, depending on the basicity of M. With NH4+(H2O)n as RI, the product ions of pyridine and DTBP with higher basicity were MH+(H2O)x while cyclopentanone, 2-nonanone, and acetophenone with lower basicity produce MNH4+(H2O)x. To interpret the formation of product ions, the interaction energies of M–H+, H+–NH3, and H+–OH2 in the M–H+–NH3 and M–H+–OH2 and M–H+–M complexes were computed by B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) method. It was found that for a molecule M with high basicity, the M–H+ interaction is strong leading in weakening of the H+–NH3, and H+–OH2 interactions in the M–H+–NH3 and M–H+–OH2 complexes.

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Security Mission Information & Innovation Group – SMI2G

2019-01-17
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MaSaTECH will participate on SMI2G meeting, 29-30th January 2019, Brussels

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Explosives detection by Portable-Advanced Ion Mobility Spectrometer implemented to Mobile Robotic Arm

2018-11-30
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We are proud that Portable Advanced Ion Mobility Spectrometer was successfully tested and implemented to mobile robotic arm by group of Dr. Jankiewicz from Institute of Optoelectronics, Warsaw Military University of Technology. The PAIMS was successfully tested for remote detection of explosives from various surfaces. The high sensitivity of PAIMS was supported by our unique Laser Desorption technique developed for analysis of solids and surfaces.

Fast Quantification of Whisky Lactone in Oak Wood by Advanced Ion Mobility Spectrometer – AIMS

2018-04-27
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Whisky lactone (WL) in oak staves / barrels has the biggest share in the resulting taste of beverages. The quantity of WL in oak wood have strong effect on quality of final products. Based on WL quantity, the barrel’s staves are divided into ten categories. This categories are category1 (0-7 μg/g), ......, category10 (63-70 μg/g). In this application report we are introducing the ion mobility spectrometer as useful tool for fast monitoring and quantification of whisky lactone in oak wood.

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Separation of Isomeric Compounds by Advanced Ion Mobility Spectrometer - AIMS

2018-01-12
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The ion mobility spectrometry technique offers advantages like high sensitivity (ppb range), fast response (ms range), compact design, operation in atmospheric pressure and ability to separate the isomeric compounds. As ion mobility spectrometers do not work in vacuum, the ion movement is not straightforward. There occur huge numbers of ion-molecule interactions between charged ions and neutral particles of a drift gas. Thus the ion separation in IMS is not based just on their mass but also on their cross section. This gives an advantage to the IMS technique for fast separation of isomers. In this Lab-Report we will demonstrate the ability of AIMS technique to separate the isomeric compounds.

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Laser Desorption-Ion Mobility Spectrometry As a Useful Tool For Surface Analysis

2016
surface analysis

INNMS 2016 Moscow - Invited lecture

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Laser desorption-ion mobility spectrometry as a useful tool for imaging of thin layer chromatography surface

2016
material analysis

Journal of Chromatography A, Volume 1459, 12 August 2016, p. 145–151. DOI: 10.1016/j.chroma.2016.06.069.

We present a novel method for coupling thin layer chromatography (TLC) with ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) using laser desorption technique (LD). After separation of the compounds by TLC, the TLC surface was sampled by the LD-IMS without any further manipulation or preparation. The position of the laser was fixed and the TLC plate was moved in desired directions by the motorized micro-positioning stage. The method was successfully applied to analyze the TLC plates containing explosives (tri nitro toluene, 1,3,5-trinitro- 1,3,5-triazacyclohexane, pentaerythritol tetranitrate, 2,4-dinitro toluene and 3,4-dinitro toluene), amino acids (alanine, proline and isoleucine), nicotine and diphenylamine mixtures and detection limits for these compounds were determined. Combination of TLC with LD-IMS technique offers additional separation dimension, allowing separation of overlapping TLC analytes. The time for TLC sampling by LD-IMS was less than 80 s. The scan rate for LD is adjustable so that fast and effective analysis of the mixtures is possible with the proposed method.

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Direct Liquid Sampling for Corona Discharge Ion Mobility Spectrometry

2015
liquid analysis

Anal. Chem., 2015, 87 (14), p. 7389–7394. DOI: 10.1021/acs.analchem.5b01585.

We present a new technique suitable for direct liquid sampling and analysis by ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). The technique is based on introduction of a droplet stream to the IMS reaction region. The technique was successfully used to detect explosives dissolved in methanol and oil as well as to analyze amino acids and dipeptides. One of the main advantages of this technique is its ability to analyze liquid samples without the requirement of any special solution.

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